EXCLUSIVE: Derrick Williams Talks Life After Football

EXCLUSIVE: Derrick Williams Talks Life After Football

Former Penn State and NFL wide receiver Derrick Williams talks about the end of his football career, and what he's doing now.<br>

ALTOONA - After a fantastic career in Happy Valley and more than two years of playing in the NFL, former Nittany Lion wide receiver Derrick Williams says he is done with his pro football run.

"I made it to the NFL and didn't have the career that I wanted to have," says Williams.  "But I'm in that small percentile that made it, and that was great for me."

After a high-profile college career at Penn State, Williams was selected in third round of the 2009 draft by the Detroit Lions.  He played just two seasons for them, and never scored a touchdown.

The last NFL action he saw was in the preseason last fall, when he played for the Pittsburgh Steelers.   The team released him before the regular season.

"I think I ran into a numbers game with [the Steelers]," says Williams.  "They took a lot of running backs because of the injuries that they had.  But that's just the nature of the game.  And it was a good experience."

Although he is done playing football, he hasn't left the sport completely.  Thursday, he will be volunteering his time as a coach at Bishop Guilfoyle's youth football camp. (The camp is free to kids in grades 3-8, and runs from 5-7pm at Bishop Guilfoyle High School.)

"I'm always for helping out kids, especially helping them get to another level because there were so many guys that helped me out," says Williams.

The wideout and return man now lives in Hollidaysburg and works in sales for Blair Companies.  But he has a few side projects as well - he trains athletes, and hopes to be an analyst for Penn State football games this season.

"I still love the game, and I know the game," says Williams.  "I know it like the back of my hand.  I can close my eyes and tell it from a player's point of view."

Williams is also one of the hundreds of former Penn State football players to support the NCAA overturning, or lessening, the sanctions on the football program.

"With everything that happened, I don't think the kids should be punished for one person's crazy time," says Williams.  "Us as alumni, we want to see the best for our team."

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