Typical Patients Don't Participate in Studies

Typical Patients Don't Participate in Studies

Younger, healthier males more likely to take part.

Results from clinical trials determine which new drugs are approved, but a new study finds people taking part in these studies of heart treatments don't represent real world patients.

Researchers analyzed the largest ongoing study of U.S. heart attack patients. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, reviewed data collected from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry of heart attack patients treated at 466 hospitals across the U.S from July 1, 2008 to March 31, 2011.

They say more than half of the people eligible to take part in the study decided not to. Those who did were younger, more likely to be male, had less previous heart disease and more frequently received the recommended medical treatment within 24 hours.

Authors of the analysis are calling for broader enrollment in clinical trials for heart disease.

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