Police Increasing Steer Clear Enforcement

Police Increasing Steer Clear Enforcement

Police are cracking down on aggressive drivers, specifically those who don't steer clear of pulled over cars.
Police are cracking down on aggressive drivers, specifically those who don't steer clear of pulled over cars.

The Steer Clear law has been in effect for a while but State College Police say drivers still speed by, right next cars and emergency crews pulled over on the shoulder.

"People just aren't moving over," says Lt. Chris Fishel with the State College Police Department.

The Steer Clear law and its enforcement is supposed to deter drivers from getting too close to cars pulled over.

"It's designed to create enough of a buffer so that emergency responders can operate on the inside lane," says Lt. Fishel.

During Thursday's enforcement detail, State College Police cited 15 drivers for speeding and 7 for failing to move over. Police say it can be very dangerous while those cars are driving by.

"If the car hasn't pulled over far enough that you're pulling over onto the shoulder, you can feel the pressure from the car that's blowing by," says Lt. Fishel.

Police aren't the only ones who are fearful when responding to a car on the side of the road.

"It's really hard to concentrate and stay focused on your job when you have to subconsciously turn around and be focused on the traffic that's going on around you," says John Tennis, the owner of Tennis Towing in State College.

He says he hopes police enforcement for the Steer Clear law brings about change.

"Just move over and slow down," says Tennis.  "I understand it might take you a couple minutes more to get to where you're going but you don't want to to have to deal with the consequences either."

Lieutenant Fishel says the Pennsylvania traffic laws are build on being reasonable and police can be understanding, knowing sometimes drivers cannot get into a different lane due to the amount of traffic.
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